Hair Ball from the Stomach of a Hog.
I spent a few days last week on the Gettysburg College campus lecturing about science communication, YouTube, women in science. I also learned a great deal about the campus’s former natural history collection. This hair ball is one of few surviving specimens from the museum founded in the mid 1800’s, surviving the American Civil War, the building standing during the Battle of Gettysburg. Despite how much we know about the history of the town, the details about the disbanded Linnaean Society of the former Pennsylvania College and its extensive collection have, quite unfortunately, been forgotten over time. 
I had the opportunity to comb through some old ledgers with a lovely former student, Sara, who spent her senior year and some time afterwards compiling as much information as possible about the artifacts and specimens, attempting to track down their origins and current statuses. So much has been forgotten over time; a lapse of judgement by a few short-sighted individuals means hundreds of years of natural history gone in as little effort as taking out the trash. 
Why was this hairball preserved - and how? Why is it one of the last remaining specimens from this collection of thousands? I really wish we knew. 

Hair Ball from the Stomach of a Hog.

I spent a few days last week on the Gettysburg College campus lecturing about science communication, YouTube, women in science. I also learned a great deal about the campus’s former natural history collection. This hair ball is one of few surviving specimens from the museum founded in the mid 1800’s, surviving the American Civil War, the building standing during the Battle of Gettysburg. Despite how much we know about the history of the town, the details about the disbanded Linnaean Society of the former Pennsylvania College and its extensive collection have, quite unfortunately, been forgotten over time.

I had the opportunity to comb through some old ledgers with a lovely former student, Sara, who spent her senior year and some time afterwards compiling as much information as possible about the artifacts and specimens, attempting to track down their origins and current statuses. So much has been forgotten over time; a lapse of judgement by a few short-sighted individuals means hundreds of years of natural history gone in as little effort as taking out the trash. 

Why was this hairball preserved - and how? Why is it one of the last remaining specimens from this collection of thousands? I really wish we knew. 

whenyouworkatamuseum:

A couple of months ago, I asked you guys to help me crowd-source a museum-career-advice column. Several times a week, I get emails from people who want to work in a museum asking me how to get their foot in the door, or how to succeed in a museum career, so I thought a crowd-sourced advice column…

PREACH.

If you ask me how to get a job in a museum, I will send you a link to this. 

WYWAAM is heavily focused on art museums as that’s where the author works, but once you get into the nitty-gritty there are few differences in the experience realm that can’t also be applied to natural history museums. 

Tags: museums jobs

The Brain Scoop: 
Year of the Passenger Pigeon

September 2014 marks the 100-year anniversary of the passenger pigeon’s extinction. How is it possible that the number of these pigeons - at once the most numerous species on the planet - could decrease from 3.7 billion individuals to 0 in just forty years? 

During the eradication of this species many people assumed the populations would somehow renew themselves. Conservation wasn’t on the minds of most people living in North America in the mid-19th century, and given the destructive potential of a few billion birds roosting in your backyard they weren’t exactly a hallmark species. 

Could we bring back the passenger pigeon? Newly developing technologies focused on de-extinction efforts could mean we potentially bring them back… but at what cost, and more importantly, where? Habitat destruction, climate change, and human impact means we’re losing innumerable ecosystems worldwide - it’s reported that by 2050 as many as 20-30% of all life on our planet today will be extinct

We’re living during this miraculous time of incredible technology where we’re more strongly connected with one another than ever before. We have tools, resources, and access to knowledge unprecedented in human history. It’s about time we tapped into our collective awareness and begin to think critically about our individual impacts. What can we do to live in tandem with our environment? What can you do?

greendalevulcanbeing:

Emily Graslie is coming to my school and I’m really excited!

Gettysburg College, I’m coming for you! 

Thursday’s talk 9/11 (open to the public!)
“The Importance of Science Role Models in the Media” 

Too often times the term “scientist” inspires the stale image of lab goggles and a white coat, but who is responsible for transforming this stereotype—the media or the scientists themselves? Is a harmless stereotype all that bad?

The visibility of scientists and their research in the media, from television and movies, to web series, to traditional news outlets, can have a lasting impact on the general public. Whether these are practicing scientists or fictional characters, they undoubtedly influence the way we not only view these fields of research, but also in how we perceive the natural world and our roles within it: if we don’t identify with scientists or their character portrayals, does that influence our level of involvement when it comes to making decisions that are informed by scientific research? “-

Friday’s talk 9/12 (edit: for students/campus attendees)
"Communicating Science through Museums and YouTube”

YouTube sees more than 1 billion unique visitors to its website every month. It’s impossible to ignore a significant percentage of the world’s population congregating around an aggregate of online videos, but are people watching more than just music and cat videos? 

The Brain Scoop is an educational YouTube channel filmed out of e Field Museum in Chicago that aims to bring its global audience behind the closed doors of the museum’s collection. The Field houses more than 25 million specimens and artifacts within its stores, but these are only a fraction of the natural world’s treasures. e stories of researchers and their work exceed the capacity of any general on-site attendee. Join Emily Graslie as she discusses how the Museum uses new digital media to expand the outreach and impact of its scientist’s ongoing research. 

thebrainscoop:

BRAIN SCOOP MEET-UP! 
Come join us to celebrate the opening of a new exhibition, Into the Bat Caves of Kenya! 
WHO: The Brain Scoop and The Field Museum…WHAT: …made an exhibition together with our Media Producers and we’re sharing an exclusive look into some of the footage from our Kenya expedition! WHERE: The Field Museum, 1400 S. Lake Shore DriveWHEN: Tuesday, September 9th, 6-8pmWHY: BECAUSE IT’S AWESOME. 

Event Details:



Experience the excitement and challenges of a Field Museum research expedition—captured by the lens of a camera. Through large-scale media projections, see what happens when Museum filmmakers team up with The Brain Scoop to record bat calls and traipse through guano (bat dung!) in a cave deep within Kenya’s Mount Suswa. Watch the remarkable documentation of Field Museum researchers Bruce Patterson and Paul Webala’s bat research, and peer into the furry faces of East Africa’s astonishingly diverse bats in the new exhibition, Into the Bat Caves of Kenya.
On Tuesday, September 9th, meet these Museum filmmakers, researchers, and Emily Graslie of The Brain Scoop for an exclusive evening program. Hear about the delights and challenges of documenting field work with a production crew, learn more about Bruce Patterson’s work in Kenya, and get the chance to see real bat specimens from The Field Museum’s collection up-close. Tickets include beer and wine (21+ with ID), and appetizers.
Enter through the West Door
Tickets: $23 non-members; $20 members (must present member ID card at the door)

Buy your tickets heeeerrre!


THIS IS TONIGHT ALERT ALERT COME HANG OUT AND EAT SNACKS AND HAVE A BEER (or not) AND SEE SOME BATS AND LET’S TALK 

thebrainscoop:

BRAIN SCOOP MEET-UP! 

Come join us to celebrate the opening of a new exhibition, Into the Bat Caves of Kenya

WHO: The Brain Scoop and The Field Museum…
WHAT: …made an exhibition together with our Media Producers and we’re sharing an exclusive look into some of the footage from our Kenya expedition! 
WHERE: The Field Museum, 1400 S. Lake Shore Drive
WHEN: Tuesday, September 9th, 6-8pm
WHY: BECAUSE IT’S AWESOME. 

Event Details:

Experience the excitement and challenges of a Field Museum research expedition—captured by the lens of a camera. Through large-scale media projections, see what happens when Museum filmmakers team up with The Brain Scoop to record bat calls and traipse through guano (bat dung!) in a cave deep within Kenya’s Mount Suswa. Watch the remarkable documentation of Field Museum researchers Bruce Patterson and Paul Webala’s bat research, and peer into the furry faces of East Africa’s astonishingly diverse bats in the new exhibition, Into the Bat Caves of Kenya.

On Tuesday, September 9th, meet these Museum filmmakers, researchers, and Emily Graslie of The Brain Scoop for an exclusive evening program. Hear about the delights and challenges of documenting field work with a production crew, learn more about Bruce Patterson’s work in Kenya, and get the chance to see real bat specimens from The Field Museum’s collection up-close. Tickets include beer and wine (21+ with ID), and appetizers.

Enter through the West Door

Tickets: $23 non-members; $20 members (must present member ID card at the door)

Buy your tickets heeeerrre!

THIS IS TONIGHT ALERT ALERT COME HANG OUT AND EAT SNACKS AND HAVE A BEER (or not) AND SEE SOME BATS AND LET’S TALK 

Oh, VidCon. 

Oh, VidCon. 

(Source: vidconblr)

My earliest memory of being asked to contribute towards conservation was at the Minnesota Zoo as a kid, touring with my family. We turned the corner in the reptile hall and at the end of the exhibit there was a box that said something like A Dollar can save X amount of rainforest. Consider donating to help our efforts. And even as a young child I was incredibly skeptical. What was going to happen? Was I going to drop a dollar, or five, or ten, into that box - and miraculously deforestation would stop? A tree would stand strong, alone in a wasteland? We walked by it, my parents paying it no mind. 
That ambiguous mentality towards conservation persisted until I came to work at The Field Museum, when I was introduced to the Action Center team. The name in itself evokes the idea of superheroes: crime-fighters in capes, launching over the Amazon with Captain Planet and Mother Gaia. Turns out that image isn’t as realistic as it is sincere; this group really is a major boots on the ground initiative towards conservation. They are the dedicated botanists, anthropologists, ornithologists, and biologists of every assortment dropping into various areas of South America to conduct biodiversity assessments of uncharted rainforest in order create informed legislation that protects those areas. They’ve endured disease of every kind - Giardia, malaria, yellow fever, dengue, leishmaniasis - parasites, fungus, chiggers, botflies, waking up with snakes in their tents, held up at gunpoint from confused locals assuming they’re from the illegal logging industry. Two famed biologists died in a fly-over in 1993 - Ted Parker and Al Gentry pioneered this field of rapid biological assessment, creating the foundation for the decades-old legacy we carry on with their conservation mission in mind. 
And in the process these groups have secured and protected 23 million acres of wilderness of the Amazon headwaters. Looking at this map you realize that conservation initiatives are happening one area of forest at a time - slowly, with the help of new legislation, growing education, and heightened awareness of the issues at hand. 
In mid-October, I’m helicoptering into the Peruvian rainforest with this crew. It’ll be the first time Tom films out of the country - I’ve never been to South America. I’m getting my yellow fever vaccine on Monday and despite reviewing field guides and laying awake imagining the heat and mosquitoes and cacophony of the forest I’ll never be fully prepared for what we’re going to encounter in these biologically uncharted areas. 
We need to change the face of conservation from donation boxes asking for a dollar to real, relatable, actionable plans for preserving native wilderness. If it takes me getting a botfly in Peru to do so, I’m in. I just hope you’ll come along for the adventure.

My earliest memory of being asked to contribute towards conservation was at the Minnesota Zoo as a kid, touring with my family. We turned the corner in the reptile hall and at the end of the exhibit there was a box that said something like A Dollar can save X amount of rainforest. Consider donating to help our efforts. And even as a young child I was incredibly skeptical. What was going to happen? Was I going to drop a dollar, or five, or ten, into that box - and miraculously deforestation would stop? A tree would stand strong, alone in a wasteland? We walked by it, my parents paying it no mind. 

That ambiguous mentality towards conservation persisted until I came to work at The Field Museum, when I was introduced to the Action Center team. The name in itself evokes the idea of superheroes: crime-fighters in capes, launching over the Amazon with Captain Planet and Mother Gaia. Turns out that image isn’t as realistic as it is sincere; this group really is a major boots on the ground initiative towards conservation. They are the dedicated botanists, anthropologists, ornithologists, and biologists of every assortment dropping into various areas of South America to conduct biodiversity assessments of uncharted rainforest in order create informed legislation that protects those areas. They’ve endured disease of every kind - Giardia, malaria, yellow fever, dengue, leishmaniasis - parasites, fungus, chiggers, botflies, waking up with snakes in their tents, held up at gunpoint from confused locals assuming they’re from the illegal logging industry. Two famed biologists died in a fly-over in 1993 - Ted Parker and Al Gentry pioneered this field of rapid biological assessment, creating the foundation for the decades-old legacy we carry on with their conservation mission in mind. 

And in the process these groups have secured and protected 23 million acres of wilderness of the Amazon headwaters. Looking at this map you realize that conservation initiatives are happening one area of forest at a time - slowly, with the help of new legislation, growing education, and heightened awareness of the issues at hand. 

In mid-October, I’m helicoptering into the Peruvian rainforest with this crew. It’ll be the first time Tom films out of the country - I’ve never been to South America. I’m getting my yellow fever vaccine on Monday and despite reviewing field guides and laying awake imagining the heat and mosquitoes and cacophony of the forest I’ll never be fully prepared for what we’re going to encounter in these biologically uncharted areas. 

We need to change the face of conservation from donation boxes asking for a dollar to real, relatable, actionable plans for preserving native wilderness. If it takes me getting a botfly in Peru to do so, I’m in. I just hope you’ll come along for the adventure.

Photos from the staff preview of our new exhibit, Into the Bat Caves of Kenya

There are still tickets available for our meetup next Tuesday, September 9th  from 6-8pm. In addition to sandwiches and snacks, you’ll get a chance to preview some of the footage shot during our expedition to Kenya, see me covered in guano, and get a chance to talk with Bruce Patterson, curator of mammals, about his work all over the world studying these amazingly diverse and ecologically important creatures. 

Meetups are my favorite thing to do, period. It’s all well and good to write and research this show, and Tom and I have a great time creating the episodes - but it is so gratifying to be able to share our love of natural history with you all in person. I hope to see you there! 

edit: Also, it’s insanely gratifying and unbelievable to see my face and The Brain Scoop on a banner in a museum exhibit. IT’S OUT FIRST EXHIBITION OPENING! The last exhibit I was a part of was creating The Historical Collections of the Philip L. Wright Zoological Museum. We had about a dozen people show up and I was so stupid proud. Dave and I created that one with a budget of $30. 

Remember Martha, the last of her kind, who died on this day a century ago. September 1st marks the extinction of the passenger pigeon, a species of North American bird with incomparable population numbers before they were completely eradicated by humans at the beginning of the 20th century. 
3.7 billion to 0 in forty years.
And if you are wishing this wouldn’t happen again, hoping that history doesn’t repeat itself - remember that we are currently enduring the sixth major mass extinction event. While the other five in our earth’s history were naturally caused by everything from major meteoritic impacts, to extreme cooling or warming of the environment, and frequently changing atmosphere - the latest event, Number Six, is being completely attributed to humans. This is the Holocene Extinction. 
In 2012 the IUCN reported that 30% of amphibians are at risk of extinction; as well as 21% of mammals, reptiles, and fish, 12% of birds, 68% of plants. We are looking to lose 30-50% of all species of life on our planet by the middle of the century. 
This may feel like a hopeless inevitability, but the future is not set in stone. What we need for this cause is awareness. What we need is an investment of personal interest. We need voices, and students, and teachers. We need scientists, and law makers, and committees and new legislation for the environment. We need communicators. We need enthusiasts and what we really need is to ruin apathy. This is a shared planet, not just between ourselves but with every miraculous piece of life that has erupted on its unlikely surface in the last billion years. We owe it to that great improbability not to mess this up. 

Remember Martha, the last of her kind, who died on this day a century ago. September 1st marks the extinction of the passenger pigeon, a species of North American bird with incomparable population numbers before they were completely eradicated by humans at the beginning of the 20th century.

3.7 billion to 0 in forty years.

And if you are wishing this wouldn’t happen again, hoping that history doesn’t repeat itself - remember that we are currently enduring the sixth major mass extinction event. While the other five in our earth’s history were naturally caused by everything from major meteoritic impacts, to extreme cooling or warming of the environment, and frequently changing atmosphere - the latest event, Number Six, is being completely attributed to humans. This is the Holocene Extinction. 

In 2012 the IUCN reported that 30% of amphibians are at risk of extinction; as well as 21% of mammals, reptiles, and fish, 12% of birds, 68% of plants. We are looking to lose 30-50% of all species of life on our planet by the middle of the century.

This may feel like a hopeless inevitability, but the future is not set in stone. What we need for this cause is awareness. What we need is an investment of personal interest. We need voices, and students, and teachers. We need scientists, and law makers, and committees and new legislation for the environment. We need communicators. We need enthusiasts and what we really need is to ruin apathy. This is a shared planet, not just between ourselves but with every miraculous piece of life that has erupted on its unlikely surface in the last billion years. We owe it to that great improbability not to mess this up. 

September 2014 marks 100 years since the extinction of the Passenger Pigeon. It’s estimated that the population of these migrant birds fell from 3.7 billion individuals to 0 in about 40 years, largely due to human impact, habitat destruction, and a lack of regulation on hunting, trapping, and their use in competitive tourneys.

Remember Martha, the last of her kind, and what she represents as not just a hallmark of her species, but as a symbol for our fragile environments today.

September 2014 marks 100 years since the extinction of the Passenger Pigeon. It’s estimated that the population of these migrant birds fell from 3.7 billion individuals to 0 in about 40 years, largely due to human impact, habitat destruction, and a lack of regulation on hunting, trapping, and their use in competitive tourneys.

Remember Martha, the last of her kind, and what she represents as not just a hallmark of her species, but as a symbol for our fragile environments today.

Last night, Anna Goldman and I commandeered a table at Wrigley Field during an event for our Founder’s Council. 

Long story short, I’m pretty sure it was the first time a two-faced calf skull and a 2.5 foot-long walrus baculum ever made an appearance inside of the Cub’s clubhouse. 

Photos by Karen Bean, our staff photographer who runs the Field’s amazing photo archives tumblr

subborealstudios:

Emily Graslie’s, The Brain Scoop’s “Business Soon Raccoon” limited edition prints are now available here: Etsy
Get ‘em while they’re hot!

My friend Louis from art school sent along the original to me earlier this week! Soon Raccoon has never looked better. 

subborealstudios:

Emily Graslie’s, The Brain Scoop’s “Business Soon Raccoon” limited edition prints are now available here: Etsy

Get ‘em while they’re hot!

My friend Louis from art school sent along the original to me earlier this week! Soon Raccoon has never looked better. 

The Brain Scoop:
Fossil Meteorites! 

500 million years ago a collision between two asteroids threw one of them out of its rotation in the belt between Jupiter and Mars. Within a few tens of thousands of years the fragments of that meteor fell to earth and sank to the bottom of an ancient sea in modern-day Sweden. Over millions of years the mineralization process replaced many of the original elements in the meteorite, but thanks to some key identifying chemical markers our geologists and meteoriticists were able to determine that these specimens, excavated from a limestone quarry, are fragments of that ancient asteroid collision. 

The craziest part of all of this? Those fragments are still falling on earth today - in fact, one was found here in Chicago a few years ago, and after analysis it was matched to one of the fossilized fragments from Sweden. 

Separated by unthinkable distances in space and more than 500 million years, they’re reunited together again right here at The Field Museum. Now tell me that isn’t a story of star-crossed lovers. 

BRAIN SCOOP MEET-UP! 
Come join us to celebrate the opening of a new exhibition, Into the Bat Caves of Kenya! 
WHO: The Brain Scoop and The Field Museum…WHAT: …made an exhibition together with our Media Producers and we’re sharing an exclusive look into some of the footage from our Kenya expedition! WHERE: The Field Museum, 1400 S. Lake Shore DriveWHEN: Tuesday, September 9th, 6-8pmWHY: BECAUSE IT’S AWESOME. 

Event Details:



Experience the excitement and challenges of a Field Museum research expedition—captured by the lens of a camera. Through large-scale media projections, see what happens when Museum filmmakers team up with The Brain Scoop to record bat calls and traipse through guano (bat dung!) in a cave deep within Kenya’s Mount Suswa. Watch the remarkable documentation of Field Museum researchers Bruce Patterson and Paul Webala’s bat research, and peer into the furry faces of East Africa’s astonishingly diverse bats in the new exhibition, Into the Bat Caves of Kenya.
On Tuesday, September 9th, meet these Museum filmmakers, researchers, and Emily Graslie of The Brain Scoop for an exclusive evening program. Hear about the delights and challenges of documenting field work with a production crew, learn more about Bruce Patterson’s work in Kenya, and get the chance to see real bat specimens from The Field Museum’s collection up-close. Tickets include beer and wine (21+ with ID), and appetizers.
Enter through the West Door
Tickets: $23 non-members; $20 members (must present member ID card at the door)

Buy your tickets heeeerrre!

BRAIN SCOOP MEET-UP! 

Come join us to celebrate the opening of a new exhibition, Into the Bat Caves of Kenya

WHO: The Brain Scoop and The Field Museum…
WHAT: …made an exhibition together with our Media Producers and we’re sharing an exclusive look into some of the footage from our Kenya expedition! 
WHERE: The Field Museum, 1400 S. Lake Shore Drive
WHEN: Tuesday, September 9th, 6-8pm
WHY: BECAUSE IT’S AWESOME. 

Event Details:

Experience the excitement and challenges of a Field Museum research expedition—captured by the lens of a camera. Through large-scale media projections, see what happens when Museum filmmakers team up with The Brain Scoop to record bat calls and traipse through guano (bat dung!) in a cave deep within Kenya’s Mount Suswa. Watch the remarkable documentation of Field Museum researchers Bruce Patterson and Paul Webala’s bat research, and peer into the furry faces of East Africa’s astonishingly diverse bats in the new exhibition, Into the Bat Caves of Kenya.

On Tuesday, September 9th, meet these Museum filmmakers, researchers, and Emily Graslie of The Brain Scoop for an exclusive evening program. Hear about the delights and challenges of documenting field work with a production crew, learn more about Bruce Patterson’s work in Kenya, and get the chance to see real bat specimens from The Field Museum’s collection up-close. Tickets include beer and wine (21+ with ID), and appetizers.

Enter through the West Door

Tickets: $23 non-members; $20 members (must present member ID card at the door)

Buy your tickets heeeerrre!

Here’s your semiannual reminder to keep an eye out for dead or injured migrating birds! 
The above photo is a representation of as many as 2,000 individuals from 70+ species a year that die when colliding with downtown Chicago buildings during Spring and Fall migration.  
If you’re in Chicago, what should you do if you find a dead bird? Write a note with information on where the bird was found, the date it was found and put it in a ziploc bag with the bird, then contact the Field’s Bird division to schedule a time to drop it off. If you can’t bring it in the same day, toss it into a freezer. If you find an injured bird, check out this page and call the Chicago Bird Collision Monitors at (773) 988-1867.
If you don’t live in Chicago, look up a local natural history museum or nature center near you and ask if they will take in a bird - but remember, it is illegal for private citizens to possess most native birds, either in whole or in part (including skulls, bones, and even feathers), except under terms of special permits or by exemptions under hunting laws and licenses. 
Why do we do this? Our ornithologists have been collecting window-killed birds for decades: by doing so, and recording the time/place of their collection, we are gaining new insights on the migratory patterns and populations of these species and are able to track changes over time. 
What can we do to prevent more birds from flying into windows? 

 Birds will try to fly through transparent glass that they cannot detect. Birds will fly towards reflective glass that mirrors sky, plants or their own reflection!


Reduce a bird’s view through transparent glass to attractive areas of light, safety or greenery inside your house by drawing drapes or shades.

Move attractive indoor plants away from being directly next to windows or block a bird’s ability to see indoor plants.
Use external screens, window films, temporary paint or soap, decals, banners, streamers or windsocks on the outside surface of windows to block transparent or reflective glass.
Use etched/fritted/frosted glass (or window films that replicated a frosted glass effect) to reduce transparency and reflectivity of window surfaces.
Install bird safe glass that has ultra-violet patterns that make windows more visible (and avoidable) for birds.
Read more at the Chicago Bird Collision Monitors website.

Here’s your semiannual reminder to keep an eye out for dead or injured migrating birds! 

The above photo is a representation of as many as 2,000 individuals from 70+ species a year that die when colliding with downtown Chicago buildings during Spring and Fall migration.  

If you’re in Chicago, what should you do if you find a dead bird? Write a note with information on where the bird was found, the date it was found and put it in a ziploc bag with the bird, then contact the Field’s Bird division to schedule a time to drop it off. If you can’t bring it in the same day, toss it into a freezer. If you find an injured bird, check out this page and call the Chicago Bird Collision Monitors at (773) 988-1867.

If you don’t live in Chicago, look up a local natural history museum or nature center near you and ask if they will take in a bird - but remember, it is illegal for private citizens to possess most native birds, either in whole or in part (including skulls, bones, and even feathers), except under terms of special permits or by exemptions under hunting laws and licenses. 

Why do we do this? Our ornithologists have been collecting window-killed birds for decades: by doing so, and recording the time/place of their collection, we are gaining new insights on the migratory patterns and populations of these species and are able to track changes over time. 

What can we do to prevent more birds from flying into windows? 

  •  Birds will try to fly through transparent glass that they cannot detect. Birds will fly towards reflective glass that mirrors sky, plants or their own reflection!

  • Reduce a bird’s view through transparent glass to attractive areas of light, safety or greenery inside your house by drawing drapes or shades.

  • Move attractive indoor plants away from being directly next to windows or block a bird’s ability to see indoor plants.
  • Use external screens, window films, temporary paint or soap, decals, banners, streamers or windsocks on the outside surface of windows to block transparent or reflective glass.
  • Use etched/fritted/frosted glass (or window films that replicated a frosted glass effect) to reduce transparency and reflectivity of window surfaces.
  • Install bird safe glass that has ultra-violet patterns that make windows more visible (and avoidable) for birds.

Read more at the Chicago Bird Collision Monitors website.