I live on a farm in Southern Ontario, Canada and found this mystery skull at the back of our farm by our small creek, along with a raccoon skull. This skull seems to be more light weight, fragile and porous in comparison to the raccoon. However because it is broken I am having the most difficult time identify it and would love some help, if at all possible! (I set a click through link that goes to more pics if they would help at all) 
Thanks!

Hey! You’ve got yourself a juvenile domestic pig. I am able to deduce the relative age because of your description of the bone being light and porous, the lack of closure along the epiphyseal sutures (the bones have not yet fused together), and the unerupted molars on the mandible.  I am able to identify it as a pig because of the dental anatomy: pigs have omnivorous dentition with a unique pattern of tubercles along the occlusal surface (the top, grinding part). Also, the occipital region (back of the skull) on a pig is a good indicator for identification; in pigs that area is oddly flattened and peaked towards the back of the cranium, while the rest of their skull gradually slopes and lacks a prominent sagittal crest. 
Thanks for sharing!

I live on a farm in Southern Ontario, Canada and found this mystery skull at the back of our farm by our small creek, along with a raccoon skull. This skull seems to be more light weight, fragile and porous in comparison to the raccoon. However because it is broken I am having the most difficult time identify it and would love some help, if at all possible! 
(I set a click through link that goes to more pics if they would help at all) 

Thanks!

Hey! You’ve got yourself a juvenile domestic pig. I am able to deduce the relative age because of your description of the bone being light and porous, the lack of closure along the epiphyseal sutures (the bones have not yet fused together), and the unerupted molars on the mandible.  I am able to identify it as a pig because of the dental anatomy: pigs have omnivorous dentition with a unique pattern of tubercles along the occlusal surface (the top, grinding part). Also, the occipital region (back of the skull) on a pig is a good indicator for identification; in pigs that area is oddly flattened and peaked towards the back of the cranium, while the rest of their skull gradually slopes and lacks a prominent sagittal crest. 

Thanks for sharing!